Skip to main content
18 Dec 2019 | 04:03 AM UTC

Algeria: President swearing-in ceremony scheduled in Algiers December 19 /update 59

Algerian President-elect to be sworn in in Algiers on December 19; heightened security measures and transportation disruptions expected

security
transportation
DZA

Event

Algeria's newly elected President Abdelmadjid Tebboune will be sworn in on Thursday, December 19, in a public ceremony in Algiers for a five-year term. Tebboune was elected amid an ongoing political crisis in Algeria with nationwide protests taking place over several months, and will replace the interim government that has been in place since April. Many Algerians boycotted the election and continue to call for a different political structure. It is therefore expected that protests will take place in Algiers and across the country on Thursday. 

Heightened security measures and disruptions to transportation and business are to be expected due to the swearing-in ceremony and spontaneous protests. Should protests take place, clashes between protesters and police cannot be ruled out.

Context

Algeria is operating under an interim government, installed since former President Abdul-Aziz Bouteflika left office in April. On September 15, Interim President Abdelkader Bensalah announced that presidential elections would be held on December 12, following months of political tensions in Algeria sparked by former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's intention to run for a fifth term. An interim government was approved on March 31, though protesters have continued to hold demonstrations. Presidential elections previously set for July 4 were called off by the Algerian Constitutional Council after the only two candidates were rejected. Abdelmadjid Tebboune was elected on December 12 with 58 percent of the vote.

Advice

Individuals in Algiers and across Algeria are advised to monitor developments, avoid all protests and demonstrations as a precaution, and anticipate a heightened security presence and localized disruptions to business and transportation around protest sites.